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The private security sector in Africa

Enrolled: 1 student
Lectures: 3

Archive

Working hours

Monday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Tuesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Wednesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Thursday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Friday 9:30 am - 5.00 pm
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed

Archive

Working hours

Monday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Tuesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Wednesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Thursday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Friday 9:30 am - 5.00 pm
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed

Introduction

The privatisation of security has now become a global phenomenon. From the beginning of the 21st century the world has witnessed an accelerated breakdown of the nation-state’s monopoly on violence, and the emergence of marketplace purveyors of armed forces (Shreier and Caparini 2005). This is owing to a number of factors, including general human insecurity, the end of the Cold War, the globalisation phenomenon, the marketisation of the public sphere, the downsizing of armed forces, the professionalisation of armed and police forces, the drive for profit maximisation, the liberalisation of the arms trade, the general unending African conflicts and the events of 9/11.1 In the contemporary world, the privatisation of security has swept throughout the globe to unprecedented magnitude that is no longer possible to ignore, let alone comprehend. The growth of private military and police is staggering, especially in Eastern Europe, wealthy Middle Eastern states and threatened African states (Howe 1998).

The Meaning Of Private Security

1
The Meaning Of Private Security
5 Min

The forces behind the private sector

1
The forces behind the growth of the private security sector
6 Min

Human rights and the private sector

1
Human rights and the private security sector
5 Min
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